What about …. #32

Light or no light; this is the question.

We’re all fascinated by those splendid starry nights, where we see ourselves as small insignificant beings looking at a vast realm of wonders. We’re aware that those shinning white dots are painted on a black background, and that is what this is all about. I’ve been wondering about the darkness of space since I can remember.  I always thought that space was dark because that was its colour, space was THE black colour. Filled with different types of electromagnetic radiation which gives us about 97% to 3% of matter. But I’ve learned lately thanks to Joseph through the RTU blog that our eyes may deceive us sometimes. As I’ve written in a previous post called “Can we catch rainbows ”, “Pure white light” or that which comes from our Sun can be split into a continuous spectrum of frequencies that range from the shortwave ultraviolet to the near infra red longer wavelengths. Our human eye can distinguish around 10 million different such frequencies, not just 7. Seven has become a common misconception adopted as reality simply for most humans convenience. We can make black colour by mixing yellow, bleu and red, even though it’s never totally black.  To make things worse, black is the colour of an object which absorbs all of the colours of visible light, for which we can  assume to be the same as no light.

Our brain shows us what our eyes detect; they are light receptors. So when there is no light, there is nothing to be received, therefore we don’t see anything. Such as when we turn off the lights and we stand in a pitch “black” room. The room hasn’t turned black when the lights went off, it’s our brain that perceived the darkness as if it was  blackness.  We may still touch the chair or the table but we’re not able to see them. The universe uses the same mechanism with a slightly difference. The universe is only dark in the sense that it is devoid of radiation that can be detected by the human eye; if it is dark to the human, it does not make it devoid of electromagnetic radiation.

Now, to answer the main question, is space dark or black ?

It is dark. Because we perceive what has no light, black. If we take a region of space full of stars, we would notice that space is filled with light and colours. Space is a place of wonders, with which we would never be fully acquainted.

But in the reality, is space really dark? If we could travel to the end of the universe, would we see a different horizon? Or is darkness/nothingness an illusion perceived only by the human eye?

What about… #29 

Today’s post isn’t really about books, but I have to start by speaking about one that I’ve just finished. The latest novel by Dan Brown; Origin.

I have to say that I was a little disappointed. The book’s topic (about which I’ll speak further) isn’t the problem but having read all of his novels, I find this one a remake of Inferno or The Da Vinci Code or even The Lost Symbol. Robert Langdon; which is the main Charater of most of Brown’s stories, fleeing a danger with a women to try to resolve an enigma.

Usually there is something innovative which makes every book a new story, such as in “Inferno” Robert Langdon, lost his memory and was shot. In “The Da Vinci Code” everything was unexpected. In “The Lost Symbol” Robert Langdon was unexpectedly called to a meeting place to find just a severed hand waiting for him. But this one looks like a bit of every past books, Robert Langdon is in the same kind of trouble he was in every other book! Nothing unexpected.

What I DID like about this book is that it speaks a lot about art, history and science.

Now the main topic of this book is the Origin of men and its future. An atheist scientist called Kirsch made a phenomenal dicovery which cost him his life before he can share it with the world. Robert Langdon and a woman called Vidal must do the impossible to broadcast the discovery even though they are threatened to be killed by someone who wishes to stop them spreading the news, that the creation can exist without a God.

Kirsch as a believer in the Darwinian theory (but not entirely satisfied as Darwin didn’t explain how life arrived on earth in the first place) made his own reasearch.

The idea is that Life can create itself with the right ingredients and conditions; it’s a paradox when we’re aware that the univese is a world of Entropy or should we say Chaos. Let me give you some details:

We build a castle of sand by the sea, when a wave hits the castle it disorganize the sand castle into scattered grains: no more castle.

Things are irreversible, when you put a hot mug of coffee on the table, it gets cold. The coffee never magically reheat itself.

Entropy is just a fancy way of saying that things fall apart. An organized system, inevitably deteriorates. Sand castles never spontaneously appear in the universe, they only disappear.

So Kirsch enhanced a technique used in 1953 by two scientists Muller & Urey who tried to recreate the Primordial Soup, trying to create life within a flask of non living chemicals.

Chemists after them tried repeatedly using different combination of ingredients, different heath patterns but nothing worked.

But what is a Premordial Soup? After duplicating the chemicals that existed in the early oceans and atmosphere – water, methane, ammonia, and hydrogen – Muller and Urey heated all of this to simulate the boiling seas. Then they shocked it with electric charges to mimic lightning and they finally let the mixture cool just as the planet’s oceans had cooled. Of course that didn’t work. So in addition to this, Kirsch added electromagnetism to a 64 year old flask belonging to Muller and Urey and that’s it; he created Primitive organism.

According to him the Premordial Soup needed electromagnetism to put chaos in order, to create life. Therefore, if life simply happened as an inevitable by product of the laws of nature we have to conclude that because life spontaneously appeared here on earth, it almost certainly did the same thing elsewhere in the cosmos. Meaning man is not unique and man is not alone in the universe.

My first reaction was the same as Robert’s in the book: if the laws of nature can actually create life, then who created the laws?

We don’t need life to happen by product of the laws to believe that other lives exists in the cosmos. Who didn’t wonder what’s up there, gazing at the night’s sky?

Those billions of stars and what’s in between, hold such mysteries that we’re unable to provide all the answers needed to cease to be amazed at what we look at. The sky (universe) is an unfriendly place for any earthly living creature, and the “luck” as some atheists would say, has put us in the perfect planet that sustains life in all sense. But of course among the multitude of different stars, it is unthinkable that we’re the only living beings in such a vast creation. What’s out there is so far that we’re not (yet) able to reach out for them. After all…. after seeing all those Alien movies saying that they are monsters wanting to destroy us in any possible way….. I’m not sure that they are so far from us for no reason. In reality, I believe that we have our own issues here, for land, for beliefs, for ethnicity… can you imagine if we had Aliens as well to negotiate with? We’re not mature enough to handle something smarter, stronger and maybe taller than us. We’re still savages fighting among ourselves, what’s out there are other creations either more peaceful or more rebellious and either of these, we’re no match for it.

Some people don’t believe in extraterrestrial life, why not?

The universe is big enough for all of us, and surely what is beyond our knowledge is far more real and powerful than what we’re aware of. We don’t need to go into other galaxies to search for life, our own has 200 to 400 billion of stars. Can you put a percentage on how many of these are such as ours? Let’s say 1%, that gives us 2-4 billion of possibilities where a developed form of life exists.

Next time you look at the skies, be sure that somewhere out there, another form of life is gazing at the same stars you’re looking at. We’re not alone, we share the same universe, the same questions, the same Creator.

If I were interested in the origin of men, among all the books available I would read this one, which is very interesting and surprising.

A star in the void (poem #163)

I’ve looked up at night
I was in awe by the sight
Millions of shining lights
Falling on earth so bright
Magical Stars sailing
Through darkness burning
To fulfil their life’s objective
And their future subjective
Surrounded by the void
A fate they can’t avoid
Into darkness they’ll fall
Hiding behind the wall
Absorbing everything
And leaving nothing

I thank Uzma for helping me chose the title.

What about… #1

There are powerful things in the universe, far away from us, which exist for a reason. One of those beings are Black Holes. 

We all heard about those strange, terrific, black, absorbing entities, but are they real? Are they what they seem to be?

First thing first, what’s a black hole: When a supergiant stars (O type) dies, they explode into supernovas and then colapse over themselves and turn into a black hole or neutron stars. The density of this one is so dense that nothing can escape its attraction. The Suns that end likewise have between 15 and 90 times the mass of the Sun and they are between 30,000 and 1,000,000 times as luminous as the Sun.

The black holes act like whirepools, they pull everything within their reach such as planets, suns, satellites… and particles such as light. That’s why they cannot be seen, we need High Tech telescopes to detect light diffraction which help us notice that something huge is in the way.

Some theories say that black holes aren’t as we believe them to be. They’re not holes, and  they’re different from what we imagine, because we’ve never seen one. But what difference does it make, either a hole or not. The amount of gravity the hole exerts is so powerful that nothing absorbed remains as it is.

Let me explain: there is something called The Event Horizon, whatever crosses that line is doomed to be shattered, exploded, annelid before reaching the entity itself. The object inside the horizon zone is streched to the point that a ball will look like a drop (see sketch #12) nothing comes out of the horizon zone, its fate is sealed.

The light curves arriving at that limit so that the image (light) of a star will become two, in different directions.

These monsters are what keep the expansion of the universe as it is, not too fast, nor too slow (thank God).

There are a few in our Galaxy among which one is at its center, in the constelation of Sagittarius, called Sagittarius A, it’s a supermassive one, probably to keep the Milky Way in shape. There is nothing to worry about;  it is way too far to have a direct effect on our solar system.

The bottom line is that, we’re not able to know exactly what these black holes are. Some believe they may be a way to another universe, while others believe they are a way to the future or to the past…

Whatever the answer is, Black Holes are mysteries among mysteries

Poetry #6

Stars running in the void

unleash a tremendous feeling 

that we cannot avoid,

clouds of gas and dust melting

into the black of darkness.

By diverse temperature they leave their mark

where they once lived is now emptiness 

just their memories remain to spark.

Fine measurements are required 

for life to exist and be admired,

while other planets are dead as stones

this one is filled with water and air,

with which tiny drops are the keystones

creating living plants per pair.

While greedy predators enjoy all the work for free,

life is sustained by a power capable to see

which pitiful being believes that everything comes out of the blue

without law nor order, which is not true.