Customer’s hotel review

I’m wondering…. Do you read the customer’s review before booking a room in a hotel?

To tell you the truth, it is not very often that I do. Living on the roads, you get used to what you find. But on some occasions, an instinct comes to tell you “see what the people say about it”.

And that’s what I did yesterday. I was going to book a room in a cheap place (which I won’t be naming here but it is in Belgium) when i found that I had to pay for the towels and sheets. But how much do they ask for it? Time to check the hotel’s comments, who knows, perhaps someone said the fee. 😉 be sure to read all of them and if you had a good laugh as I did, please leave a comment.


Comment 1

We could not enjoy the rented property because it was already rented by another family. Fortunately neighbors were able to accommodate us in a small cottage. We visited the house originally rented and the bathroom is in the room, there is no door to the toilet and the work is not finished (dangerous for children)

Comment 2

The owner was not there and did not welcome us. The room has no door and the only shower in the house was in the room. There are holes on the ceiling and on the floor as well as a cat who does not hesitate to search our things at night (it was not indicated on the ad and I am allergic). None of the features listed on the ad have been verified.

Comment 3

The host was very helpful and gave us good information on how to reach the house. The rooms were big and the bed was comfortable. The bathroom was equipped and soap/towels were provided to the visitors.

· The house address was special and some signs to direct visitors by car would have been helpful. The kitchen could have used lighting as it was dark at night. The bathroom and the main room were combined which was a shame !

Comment 4

Awesome location, you can find everything you need in this big house. Kind owner, always trying to pleased guests need.

Shared house with no privacy, missing door and ceilings, still a work in progress I guess. The only toilet and shower are in the main room with nothing to separate them from bed side, 2nd toilet out of order most of the time.

Comment 5

A bumpy unimproved road to the cottage in a forest area. A lot of garbage outside the cottage. Nobody there. Phone call. Key outside somewhere. Dark inside, hardly any bulbs. Three sleeping rooms, each having blankets as doors. Blankets also before the windows. All cupboards filled with personal belongings; apparently somehow someone lives here and leaves it then for rental purposes. Just one closet upstairs, also in the open air. Floors of the sleeping rooms are being renovated, with missing boards: mind your steps. Someone arrived during the night, heard him / her snore. I am used to sleep everywhere; but this time I had a creepy feeling.

Comment 6
This establishment is almost impossible to reach. The address is very complicated and the city name is wrong. In addition, the owner was not helpful. When we reached the place at 10:30 PM everything was closed and after a phone call we got an answering machine although we specified an arrival time in between 10 and 11 PM. Therefore we had no access to the room. The following day we called again the owner. She lied telling us that she was waiting for us very lately and that she sent SMS. Of course we got nothing. We are asking for a full refund and we noticed similar bad experiences within the comments of the website. Altogether this is everything but serious.

Comment 7
1) The property was difficult to find. The road leading to it was narrow, muddy (especially after a rainy day) and not well signposted. The front of the property was a tip.
2) The living room looks really nice but I think the owner was more concerned about collecting trinkets than actually making the place safe and fit for purpose.
3) There are no doors to the rooms for privacy. Just curtains hanging by the door frames.
4) There is a gap on the floor as you enter one of the rooms and my wife’s foot got caught. Obviously you tend to look into the room as you enter, and a gap on the floor is the last thing you expect.
5) The floor boards outside the property have not really been brushed for a long time and has accumulated gunk which made it very slippery on a rainy day. My 10 yr old son slipped and hurt his back. He was already aware it was slippery, but still slipped because it was just too slippery.
6) The door to the side of the property was not locked and the owner did not leave the key to lock that door. We felt very vulnerable.
7) There is no separate toilet/shower. However, one room had an open plan toilet/ shower. Remember that there are no doors. It means somebody can just go into your room, do his business and leave a stinking smell in your room all the time while you’re in bed. You can even play pass-the-tissue if you want.
8) The worst part of all was when we had a power cut. Yes, an electricity power cut. I can see that other houses have electricity so it’s just the house we are in that has no power. I texted the owner and told her about the power cut. She did not even address that problem. No lights and no heating. It was very cold. The house was not properly insulated.
9) The owner phoned that there were other people coming to stay for the night. We are in the middle of nowhere. Side door unlocked. No doors to the rooms. No lights. And strangers will arrive in the middle of the night! It was a nightmare.


Come on! What’s this place? Be sure to read the reviews before booking somewhere you’ve never been.

A journey in Brazil – part 8

Finally we headed to Rio. As it was in the afternoon, we stayed on the outskirts of town. On a lovely quiet Motel. It was different than all the others we’ve been. I guess they had a part of it for families, so a kind of Hotel. I remember in the morning we went down to eat breakfast. It was a good place.
Rio de Janeiro, was different than we thought. As we were there in late winter / early spring there weren’t any naked women on the beach or masses of tourists. No, it was pleasant to be there. Founded in 1565 by the Portuguese, the city was initially the seat of the Captaincy of Rio de Janeiro, a domain of the Portuguese Empire. Later, in 1763, it became the capital of the State of Brazil, a state of the Portuguese Empire. In 1808, when the Portuguese Royal Court transferred itself from Portugal to Brazil, Rio de Janeiro became the chosen seat of the court of Queen Maria I of Portugal, who subsequently, in 1815, under the leadership of her son, the Prince Regent, and future King João VI of Portugal, raised Brazil to the dignity of a kingdom, within the United Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil, and Algarves. Rio stayed the capital of the pluricontinental Lusitanian monarchy until 1822, when the War of Brazilian Independence began. This is one of the few instances in history that the capital of a colonising country officially shifted to a city in one of its colonies. Rio de Janeiro subsequently served as the capital of the independent monarchy, the Empire of Brazil, until 1889, and then the capital of a republican Brazil until 1960 when the capital was transferred to Brasília.
Europeans first encountered Guanabara Bay on 1 January 1502 (hence Rio de Janeiro, “January River”), by a Portuguese expedition. Allegedly the Florentine explorer Amerigo Vespucci participated as observer at the invitation of King Manuel I in the same expedition.
In 1555, one of the islands of Guanabara Bay, now called Villegagnon Island, was occupied by 500 French colonists under the French admiral Nicolas Durand de Villegaignon. Consequently, Villegagnon built Fort Coligny on the island when attempting to establish the France Antarctique colony.

The city of Rio de Janeiro proper was founded by the Portuguese on 1 March 1565 and was named São Sebastião do Rio de Janeiro, in honour of St. Sebastian, the saint who was the namesake and patron of the Portuguese then-monarch Sebastião. Rio de Janeiro was the name of Guanabara Bay. Until early in the 18th century, the city was threatened or invaded by several mostly French pirates and buccaneers, such as Jean-François Duclerc and René Duguay-Trouin.

In the late 17th century, still during the Sugar Era, the Bandeirantes discovered gold and diamonds in the neighbouring captaincy of Minas Gerais, thus Rio de Janeiro became a much more practical port for exporting wealth (gold, precious stones, besides the sugar) than Salvador, Bahia, much farther northeast. On 27 January 1763, the colonial administration in Portuguese America was moved from Salvador to Rio de Janeiro. The city remained primarily a colonial capital until 1808, when the Portuguese royal family and most of the associated Lisbon nobles, fleeing from Napoleon’s invasion of Portugal, moved to Rio de Janeiro.
The kingdom’s capital was transferred to the city, which, thus, became the only European capital outside of Europe. As there was no physical space or urban structure to accommodate hundreds of noblemen who arrived suddenly, many inhabitants were simply evicted from their homes.

Unfortunately it was expensive to go up the Cristo Rei, so we contented ourselves to see the town from the highest part we could go.
The favelas could be seen as a hidden part of town.
After these two months spent in Brazil, we decided to cross the border to Argentina by bus. But that’s another story.

A journey in Brazil – part 7

We headed to Belo Horizonte in the county of Minas Gerais which means “general mines” which is a poor county. There were mines once. Don’t remember much of this town except that we’ve slept two nights in the same hotel which had a night club just in front which had loud music playing all night. The region was first settled in the early 18th century, but the city as it is known today was planned and constructed in the 1890s, to replace Ouro Preto as the capital of Minas Gerais. The city features a mixture of contemporary and classical buildings, and is home to several modern Brazilian architectural icons, most notably the Pampulha Complex. In planning the city, Aarão Reis and Francisco Bicalho sought inspiration in the urban planning of Washington, D.C.
The city is built on several hills and is completely surrounded by mountains. There are several large parks in the immediate surroundings of Belo Horizonte.
The metropolis was once a small village, founded by João Leite da Silva Ortiz, a bandeirante explorer from São Paulo. The explorer settled in the region in 1701, leaving a gold rush expedition. He then established a farm called “Curral d’el Rey”which means “King’s Corral”. The farm’s wealth and success encouraged people from surrounding places to move into the region, and Curral del Rey became a village surrounded by farms.
Another important factor contributing to the growth of the village was the migrants from the São Francisco River region, who had to pass through Curral d’el Rey to reach southern parts of Brazil. Travelers usually visited a small wooden chapel, where they prayed for a safe trip. Due to this fact, the chapel was named Capela da Nossa Senhora da Boa Viagem, which means “Chapel of Our Lady of the Good Journey.” After the construction of Belo Horizonte, the old baroque chapel was replaced by a neo-gothic church that became the city’s cathedral.

Then came the last part of our journey, we headed toward Rio but stopped in Petropolis.
Wow! this town was so different from all the others. It was a wealthy gorgeous town full of trees and plants. The town’s name (“city of Peter”) honors Pedro II, the last Emperor of Brazil, who is entombed there at the Cathedral of Saint Peter. It is also known as The Imperial City, located 68 kilometres (42 mi) northeast of Rio de Janeiro. The city was the summer residence of the Brazilian Emperors and aristocrats in the 19th century, and was the official capital of the state of Rio de Janeiro during the First Brazilian Republic, between 1894 and 1902.

Until the 18th century, the region was inhabited by the crowned indians, which earned it the Portuguese name of “Sertão dos Índios Coroados”. It was only with the discovery of gold in Minas Gerais and the consequent opening of the new way of the mines that passed through Petrópolis in that century that the region began to be occupied by non-indians.
Not far from there, there was another town called Teresopolis. This one was completely the opposite. This town was poor but surrounded by natural beauties. Before the arrival of the Portuguese to the area where Teresópolis lies today, in the 16th century, it was inhabited by Indians. In the following centuries, Portuguese started buying land there. The region was also occupied by a quilombo, formed by runaway slaves coming from sugar cane plantations near Rio de Janeiro.
In 1821, an English citizen George March (born and raised in Portugal) established a farm there, which later became the most important settlement along the way between the court, in Rio de Janeiro, and the territory of Minas Gerais, which led to the great improvement of agriculture and cattle raising.
The Brazilian imperial family was much impressed by the natural beauty and the climate of the region, which developed slowly so that in 1855 the settlement became a village that was named Freguesia de Santo Antonio de Paquequer.
The further development of the village was due to the traders that came from Minas Gerais in the way to Rio de Janeiro, and used the region as a resting stop. Finally, on July 6, 1891, the village became a municipality that was named Teresópolis (“city of Teresa”), after Empress Teresa Cristina, wife of Emperor Pedro II.

In this pic, we were running out of gas. Like fools we took our chance to get to the next town.

A journey in Brazil – part 6

We arrived there one or two days later in the afternoon. Brazilia is the capital. It is a new town very widely spread. Brasília was planned and developed by Lúcio Costa, Oscar Niemeyer and Joaquim Cardozo in 1956 to move the capital from Rio de Janeiro to a more central location. The landscape architect was Roberto Burle Marx. The city’s design divides it into numbered blocks as well as sectors for specified activities, such as the Hotel Sector, the Banking Sector and the Embassy Sector. Brasília was chosen as a UNESCO World Heritage Site due to its modernist architecture and uniquely artistic urban planning. It has also been named “City of Design” by UNESCO in October 2017 and has been part of the Creative Cities Network since then.
We left at sun down. And drove at night again. In this country, trucks didn’t have speed limits like here, they can drive at whatever speed they want, hence it wasn’t rare to see overturned trucks on the roadside. That night, as we were driving, there was this truck following us who was driving at the same speed we were driving! It was so scary. We have seen accidents occasionally and once a deadly one.
Finally some hundred kilomètres south east from Brazilia we arrived at a small hotel with a lovely room in a small town.
There were two kinds of lodging that we used.
The hotels which were clean and comfortable, but they costed about 40-60 bucks.
And the motels which were cheap, and often more luxurious than the hotels. The only issue is that the motels in Brazil aren’t the family ones we find in Us. No “they’re for other purposes”. That’s why they’re clean, modern and have private parking spaces. But I hated those places, not only because i knew what they were for, but also because often we could hear “the business” the neighbours were doing. That was disgusting and hateful. I wasn’t to chose where we spent the night. If I was asked i would have prefered to pay 10-20 more and sleep in a hotel!
In most of them, you can rent the room for the night. But in some you can’t, you must stay only a few hours.

Some pics: