What about … #36

We wouldn’t be able to live without the main source of light which is the sun. When we think about it, it is more vital than any other thing around us. Without it we wouldn’t have food, water, heat or even vitamin D. Thank God that we’re on a planet not too close nor too far from this special star.
The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System. It is a nearly perfect sphere of hot plasma, with internal convective motion that generates a magnetic field via a dynamo process. It is by far the most important source of energy for life on Earth. Its diameter is about 109 times that of Earth, and its mass is about 330,000 times that of Earth, accounting for about 99.86% of the total mass of the Solar System.
The thing is that stars aren’t all equal some of them are bigger but short-lived, some are smaller but live a very long life.

DWARF STARS “K and M type”
Dwarf stars are relatively small stars, up to 20 times larger than our sun and up to 20,000 times brighter.

YELLOW DWARF “G type”
Yellow dwarfs are small, main sequence stars. The Sun is a yellow dwarf.

RED DWARF “F type”
A red dwarf is a small, cool, very faint, main sequence star whose surface temperature is under about 4,000 K. Red dwarfs are the most common type of star. Proxima Centauri is a red dwarf.

RED GIANT “A type”
A red giant is a relatively old star whose diameter is about 100 times bigger than it was originally, and had become cooler (the surface temperature is under 6,500 K). They are frequently orange in color. Betelgeuse is a red giant. It is about 20 times as massive as the Sun about 14,000 times brighter than the Sun, and about 600 light-years from Earth.

BLUE GIANT “B type”
A blue giant is a huge, very hot, blue star. It is a post-main sequence star that burns helium.

SUPERGIANT “O type”
A supergiant is the largest known type of star; some are almost as large as our entire solar system. Betelgeuse and Rigel are supergiants. These stars are rare. When supergiants die they supernova and become black holes.

The difference between these stars are their size, temperature, mass, luminosity and radius. In about 4-6 billion years our star will turn into a red giant in its final stage. So the next time when we think that it’s a really hot day, we might think twice before saying it.

Author: Novus Lectio

You'll never know what you'll read next. Random lecture is what is all about but one thing is for sure, it's by the same author who wrote The Theory of Fate and Who Went Out of Africa

3 thoughts on “What about … #36”

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