People of the book – part 21 (song of Salomon)

2/ The word Muhammadim is mentioned a few times in the Bible. Its translation is “altogether lovely” or ‘The Praised One’. Hence in other places the word Muhammadim really means “altogether lovely”. In Arabic too, it means the praised one. But…. In this chapter of the Bible It doesn’t. It refers to a person in my opinion.

Here it is:

Song of Solomon 5:16 :
His mouth is most sweet: yea, he is “altogether lovely” . This is my beloved, and this is my friend, O daughters of Jerusalem.

The Hebrew word used there is Muhammuddim. The end letters IM is plural of respect majesty and grandeur used in Hebrew. Minus “im” the name is Muhamud.

Now let’s read all of it:

Songs of Salomon 5: 1-16

1 I am come into my garden, my sister, my spouse: I have gathered my myrrh with my spice; I have eaten my honeycomb with my honey; I have drunk my wine with my milk: eat, O friends; drink, yea, drink abundantly, O beloved.

2 I sleep, but my heart waketh: it is the voice of my beloved that knocketh, saying, Open to me, my sister, my love, my dove, my undefiled: for my head is filled with dew, and my locks with the drops of the night.

3 I have put off my coat; how shall I put it on? I have washed my feet; how shall I defile them?

4 My beloved put in his hand by the hole of the door, and my bowels were moved for him.

5 I rose up to open to my beloved; and my hands dropped with myrrh, and my fingers with sweet smelling myrrh, upon the handles of the lock.

6 I opened to my beloved; but my beloved had withdrawn himself, and was gone: my soul failed when he spake: I sought him, but I could not find him; I called him, but he gave me no answer.

7 The watchmen that went about the city found me, they smote me, they wounded me; the keepers of the walls took away my veil from me.

8 I charge you, O daughters of Jerusalem, if ye find my beloved, that ye tell him, that I am sick of love.

9 What is thy beloved more than another beloved, O thou fairest among women? what is thy beloved more than another beloved, that thou dost so charge us?

10 My beloved is white and ruddy, the chiefest among ten thousand.

11 His head is as the most fine gold, his locks are bushy, and black as a raven.

12 His eyes are as the eyes of doves by the rivers of waters, washed with milk, and fitly set.

13 His cheeks are as a bed of spices, as sweet flowers: his lips like lilies, dropping sweet smelling myrrh.

14 His hands are as gold rings set with the beryl: his belly is as bright ivory overlaid with sapphires.

15 His legs are as pillars of marble, set upon sockets of fine gold: his countenance is as Lebanon, excellent as the cedars.

16 His mouth is most sweet: yea, he is altogether lovely. This is my beloved, and this is my friend, O daughters of Jerusalem.

Some say, it is the wife of Salomon who speaks about her husband. How can this be if “The watchmen that went about the city found her, they smote her, they wounded her; the keepers of the walls took away her veil from her.” unless they wanted to be sentenced to death! This is not acceptable.
It is easily seen that this woman was in love of someone who wasn’t present, who didn’t exist yet. But she knew his name was Muhammed.

Author: Novus Lectio

You'll never know what you'll read next. Random lecture is what is all about but one thing is for sure, it's by the same author who wrote The Theory of Fate and Who Went Out of Africa

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