What about … #7

We’re not quite alone in our Milky Way, we may think of ourselves as Aliens, we travel each day on our spaceship at about 721,000 km/h and 935,000 km/h depending on the day of the year as I have found in this website http://www.urban-astronomer.com/astronomy/how-fast-is-the-earth-travelling-through-space/ so between 17304000 km/day to 22440000 km/day around the Galaxy, that means that we won’t be in the same spot we were yesterday for ~250 million years, but we’re not lonely, we have stars all around us, to keep us company in this huge univers, and that’s  not all, our galaxy is traveling at about 1080000km/h so 25920000km/day.  It’s breathtaking isn’t it?

Now as we’re all aware, this isn’t the only galaxy around, we have a bunch them around, this are the closest ones:

# Galaxy Type Dist from Earth Magnitude Group

Membership

Notes Diameter (ly)
Mly Mpc M m
  1 Milky Way IR Spitzer.jpg Milky Way SBbc 0.027[2] 0.008[2] −20.8 [1] n/a Local Group Home galaxy of Earth 100,000-180,000 ly
  2 Canis Major Dwarf Irr (status as galaxy disputed) 0.025[3] 0.008 −14.5 23.3 Local Group Satellite of Milky Way(accretion by Milky Way) N/A
  3 S sgrdw1.jpg Sagittarius Dwarf SphrSagDEG dSph/E7 0.081 0.024[4] −12.67[4] 4.5[5] Local Group Satellite of Milky Way(partial accretion byMilky Way) 10,000 ly
  4 Ursa Major II Dwarf dSph 0.098 0.030 −4.2 14.3 Local Group Satellite of Milky Way(accretion by Milky Way) ~1,800 ly
  5 LH 95.jpg Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) Irr/SB(s)m 0.163 0.050[4] −17.93[4] 0.9[5] Local Group Satellite of Milky Way 14,00 ly
  6 Boötes I d Sph 0.197[5] 0.060 −5.8[6] 13.1 Local Group Satellite of Milky Way N/A
  7 Small magellanic cloud.jpg Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC, NGC 292) SB(s)m pec 0.206 0.063[4] −16.35[4] 2.7[5] Local Group Satellite of Milky Way 7,000 ly
  8 Ursa Minor Dwarf dE4 0.206 0.063[4] −7.13[4] 11.9[5] Local Group Satellite of Milky Way
  9 PGC 60095 Draco Dwarf Hubble WikiSky.jpg Draco Dwarf(DDO 208) dE0 pec 0.258 0.079[4] −8.74[4] 10.9[5] Local Group Satellite of Milky Waywith a large amount of dark matter ~2,700 x 1,900 ly
 10 NGC 2419 Hubble WikiSky.jpg NGC 2419 Glob Clus 0.275 0.084 −9.5/−11 ? 9.06 Brightest remote MW globular cluster 520 ly
 11 Sextans Dwarf Sph dSph 0.281 0.086[4] −7.98[4] 12[5] Local Group Satellite of Milky Way 8,400 ly
 12 Sculptor Dwarf Galaxy ESO.jpg Sculptor Dwarf(E351-G30) dE3 0.287 0.088[4] −9.77[4] 10.1[5] Local Group Satellite of Milky Way N/A
 13 Ursa Major I Dwarf (UMa I dSph) dSph 0.330 0.10[7] −6.75[7] Local Group Satellite of Milky Way A few thousand ly
 14 Carina Dwarf Galaxy.jpg Carina Dwarf(E206-G220) dE3 0.330 0.10[4] −8.97[7] 11.3[5] Local Group Satellite of Milky Way 1,600 ly
 15 Fornax Dwarf.jpg Fornax Dwarf(E356-G04) dSPh/E2 0.46 0.14[1] −11.5[4] 9.28[1] Local Group Satellite of Milky Way N/A
 16 Leo II Dwarf(Leo B, DDO 93) dE0 pec 0.701[8] 0.215 −9.23[4] 12.45[1] Local Group Satellite of Milky Way 4,100 ly (tidal)
 17 Ugc5470.jpg Leo I Dwarf(DDO 74, UGC 5470) dE3 0.820[8] 0.25 −10.97[4] 11.18[1] Local Group Satellite of Milky Way N/A
 18 Leo T Dwarf G[5] 1.370 0.42[9] 16[5] Local Group Satellite of Milky Way? 2,300 ly
 19 Phoenix Dwarf Hubble WikiSky.jpg Phoenix Dwarf Galaxy (P 6830) IAm 1.44 0.44 −10.22[4] 13.07[1] Local Group Satellite of Milky Way N/A
 20 NGC6822.jpg Barnard’s Galaxy (NGC 6822) IB(s)m IV-V 1.630[8] 0.50 −15.22[4] 9.32[1] Local Group Satellite of Milky Way 7,000 ly
 21 MGC1[10] Glob Clus 2 0.615 −9.2 Local Group Isolated cluster at ~200 kpc from M31 N/A
 22 Ngc185.jpg NGC 185 dE3 pec 2.010 [11] 0.62 −14.76[4] 9.99[1] Local Group Satellite of Andromeda N/A
 23 Andromeda II dE0 2.130 [11] 0.65 −9.33[4] 15.10[1] Local Group Satellite of Andromeda N/A
 24 IC10 BVHa.jpg IC 10 (UGC 192) dIrr IV/BCD[5] 2.2 0.67 −15.57[4] 12.2[1] Local Group Satellite of Andromeda N/A
 25 NGC147.jpg NGC 147 (DDO 3) dE5 pec 2.200[11] 0.68 −14.9[4] 10.36[1] Local Group Satellite of Andromeda N/A
 26 Leo A Hubble WikiSky.jpg Leo A (Leo III, DDO 69) IBm V 2.250[8] 0.80[12] −11.68[12] 12.92 Local Group Satellite of Milky Way N/A
 27 IC1613-3.jpg IC 1613 (UGC 668) IAB(s)m V 2.350[8] 0.72 −14.51[4] 9.92[1] Local Group Satellite of Andromeda N/A
 28 Andromeda I Hubble WikiSky.jpg Andromeda I dE3 pec 2.430[11] 0.75 −10.87[4] 13.9[1] Local Group Satellite of Andromeda N/A
 29 Andromeda III dE2 2.440[11] 0.75 −9.30[4] 15.20[1] Local Group Satellite of Andromeda N/A
 30 Cetus Dwarf dSph/E4 2.460[11] 0.75 −10.18[4] 14.4[1] Local Group Satellite ofAndromeda[4] N/A
 31 Hs-1999-40-a-full jpg.jpg M32 (NGC 221) E2 2.480;[8] 0.76 −15.96[4] 8.73[1] Local Group Close Satellite ofAndromeda 6,500 ly
 32 Cassiopeia Dwarf (PGC 2807155) Hubble WikiSky.jpg Cassiopeia Dwarf (Cas dSph,Andromeda VII) dSph 2.490[11] 0.76 −11.67[4] 13.65[1] Local Group Satellite ofAndromeda[4] N/A
 33 Andromeda IX dE 2.500[11] 0.77 −7.5[4] Local Group Satellite ofAndromeda[4] N/A
 34 LGS 3 ubv.jpg LGS 3 dIrr/dSph 2.510[11] 0.77 −7.96[4] 16.18[1] Local Group Satellite ofTriangulum[citation needed] N/A
 35 Andromeda V dSph 2.52[11] 0.77 −8.41[4] 16.67[1] Local Group Satellite ofAndromeda[4] N/A
 36 Pegasus dSph.gif Pegasus Dwarf Sph (And VI) dSph 2.55[11] 0.78 −10.80[4] 14.05[1] Local Group Satellite ofAndromeda[4] N/A
 37 Andromeda VIII dSph[13] 2.7 0.828 −15.6 9.1 Local Group Tidally distorted dwarf close to Andromedadiscovered 2003[13] N/A
 — Andromeda Galaxy (with h-alpha).jpg Andromeda Galaxy (M31) SA(s)b 2.56[11] 0.79 −21.58[4] 4.17[1] Local Group Largest Galaxy in the Local Group, with at least 19 satellite galaxies 220,000 ly
 38 M33.jpg Triangulum Galaxy (M33) SAc 2.64 [11] 0.81 −18.87[4] 6.19[1] Local Group Most distant (difficult) naked eye object 60,000 l

Two of these will collide with the Milky Way, M31 and M33 which their real name is Andromeda and Triangulum. 

Milky Way and Andromeda are traveling toward each other at 400 000 km/h, so unfortunately we need 4 billion years for them to collide. But really it will be a splendid view!

Maybe we’ll be able to see them from heaven?  Hope so.

Author: Novus Lectio

You'll never know what you'll read next. Random lecture is what is all about but one thing is for sure, it's by the same author who wrote The Theory of Fate and Who Went Out of Africa

14 thoughts on “What about … #7”

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