What about … #8

We may read a brief description between faith and religion here:

 Ncwritings

<<“There is a difference between religion and faith,” Irma replied. “When you are solely responsible for your beliefs no one can question you faith nor tell you what is right or wrong. That is something only you have the right to decide. We all have an inner guiding system which, when we are synchronized to it, never takes us off the right track. Religion, on the other hand, is on organized set of beliefs and shared values where certain rules and discipline determined by a few need to be obeyed by everyone.

Also, religion and politics go hand in hand. Unfortunately, religion has often been used as an instrument to control and scare people. That is why we don’t have organized religion in Aire. This is how it has been since our foundation. Everyone is free to believe in whatever they please, but it is considered a private matter. We don’t need monumental buildings to protect our faith,” her father added. “In the outer world, religion is still causing more suffering than good, like it always has throughout history. Since gods will never come down on Earth and fight against each other, why should we fight in their name between ourselves?”

“You see, Taya,” Irma continued, “faith requires nothing more than what you are willing to offer. No sacrifices, no pain. Your beliefs are your private religion.”>>

According to me, I would described it as follows: When you are solely responsible for your beliefs no one can question you faith nor tell you what is right or wrong. That is something only you have the right to decide. We all have an inner guiding system which God granted us, we may call it conscience with which, when we are synchronized to it, never takes us off the right track but most of us don’t pay attention to it and do what it seems right for our own ego. Religion, on the other hand, is on organized set of beliefs and shared values where certain rules and discipline needs to be obeyed by everyone to remain on the right track.

Also, some say that religion and politics go hand in hand while others don’t. Unfortunately, religion has often been used as an instrument to control and scare people. Well all depends of who rules. If you look for state religion in wikipedia you’ll find this:

Roman CatholicismEdit

Jurisdictions where Roman Catholicism has been established as a state or official religion:

  •  Costa Rica: article 75 of the constitution of Costa Rica confirms that “The Roman Catholic and Apostolic Religion is the religion of the State, which contributes to its maintenance, without preventing the free exercise in the Republic of other forms of worship that are not opposed to universal morality or good customs.”[5]
  •  Liechtenstein: the constitution of Liechtenstein describes the Catholic Church as the state religion and enjoying“the full protection of the State”. The constitution does however ensure that people of other faiths “shall be entitled to practise their creeds and to hold religious services to the extent consistent with morality and public order.”[6]
  •  Malta: Article 2 of the Constitution of Malta declares that “the religion of Malta is the Roman Catholic Apostolic Religion”[7]
  •  Monaco: article 9 of the constitution of Monaco describes “La religion catholique, apostolique et romaine” [the catholic, apostolic and Roman religion]” as the religion of the state.[8]
  •   Vatican City: the Vatican is an ElectiveTheocratic, or sacerdotal Absolute Monarchy[9] ruled by the Pope, who is also the Vicar of the Catholic Church. The highest state functionaries are all Catholic clergy of various national origins. It is the sovereign territory of the Holy See (LatinSancta Sedes) and the location of the Pope’s official residence, referred to as the Apostolic Palace.

Jurisdictions that give constitutional privileges to Roman Catholicism without establishing it as the state religion:

Eastern OrthodoxyEdit

  •  GreeceChurch of Greece[16]
  •  GeorgiaGeorgian Orthodox Church is not the state church of Georgia but has a special constitutional agreement with the state, with the constitution recognising “the special role of the Apostolic Autocephalous Orthodox Church of Georgia in the history of Georgia and its independence from the state.”[17] (See also Concordat of 2002)
  •  Bulgaria: in the Bulgarian Constitution, the Bulgarian Orthodox Church is recognized as “the traditional religion” of the Bulgarian people, but the state itself remains secular.

ProtestantismEdit

AnglicanismEdit

In the 19th century, there was a campaign by Liberalsdissenters and nonconformists to disestablish the Church of England. The campaign for disestablishment was revived in the 20th century when Parliament rejected the 1928 revision of the Book of Common Prayer, leading to calls for separation of church and state to prevent political interference in matters of worship. Nevertheless, the Church of England remained the state church.

LutheranismEdit

Jurisdictions where a Lutheran church has been established as a state religion include the Nordic countries.

  •  Denmark: section 4 of the Danish constitution confirms the Church of Denmark as the state church.[19]
  •  Iceland: the Icelandic constitution confirms the Church of Iceland as the state church of Iceland.[20] (73.8% of population members at 1 January 2015) [21]
  •  Norway: the Constitution of Norway stipulates that The Church of Norway, an Evangelical-Lutheran church, will remain the Established Church of Norway and will as such be supported by the State.”[22] This was amended in 2012, from“Evangelical-Lutheran religion remains the public religion of the State”. The church is granted autonomy in doctrine and appointment of bishops.[23][24][25]
  •  Finland: the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland has a special relationship with the Finnish state, its internal structure being described in a special law, the Church Act.[26] The Church Act can be amended only by a decision of the synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church and subsequent ratification by the Parliament of Finland. The Church Act is protected by the Finnish Constitution and the state can not change the Church Act without changing the constitution. The church has a power to tax its members and all corporations unless a majority of shareholders are members of theFinnish Orthodox Church. The state collects these taxes for the church, for a fee. On the other hand, the church is required to give a burial place for everyone in its graveyards.[27] (77.2% of population members at the end of 2011).[28]The President of the Republic of Finland also decides the themes for intercession days. The church does not consider itself a state church, as the Finnish state does not have the power to influence its internal workings or its theology, although it has a veto in those changes of the internal structure which require changing the Church Act. Neither does the Finnish state accord any precedence to Lutherans or the Lutheran faith in its own acts.
  •  Sweden: the Church of Sweden was until year 2000 the official state church of Sweden and Lutheran Christianity was therefore the state religion of Sweden. In spite of the separation between the state and the church in 2000, theChurch of Sweden still has a special status in Sweden. Sweden is therefore often seen as a midway between having a state religion and not. The church has its own legal regulation in the Church of Sweden Act, which regulates the church’s basic structure, creeds and right to tax members of the church (ca 70% of the population). According to the Act, the Church of Sweden must be a democratic, Lutheran people’s church. Only the Swedish Riksdag can change this fact. The connections to the Swedish royal family are complicated. For example, the Swedish constitution stipulates that the Monarch of Sweden must be a true Lutheran, accepting the doctrine of the Church of Sweden. All members of the royal house must accept the same doctrine to be able to inherit the Throne of Sweden. The parishes of the Church of Sweden are still the smallest administrative entities in Sweden and are used as civil registration and taxation units.[citation needed][original research?]
MethodismEdit

In 1928, Queen Salote Tupou III, who was a member of the church, established the Free Wesleyan Church as the state religion of Tonga.[citation needed] The chief pastor of the Free Wesleyan Church serves as the representative of the people of Tonga and of the Church at the coronation of a King or Queen of Tonga where he anoints and crowns the Monarch. In Opposition to the establishment of the Free Wesleyan Church as a state religion, the Church of Tonga separated from the Free Wesleyan Church in 1928.

Calvinism (Reformed Tradition)Edit
  •  Tuvalu: The Church of Tuvalu is the state religion, although in practice this merely entitles it to “the privilege of performing special services on major national events”.[29] The Constitution of Tuvalu guarantees freedom of religion, including the freedom to practice, the freedom to change religion, the right not to receive religious instruction at school or to attend religious ceremonies at school, and the right not to “take an oath or make an affirmation that is contrary to his religion or belief”.[30]
  •  Scotland: The Church of Scotland is recognized as the national church of Scotland, but is not a state church and thus differs from the Church of England. Its constitution, which is recognised by acts of the British Parliament, gives it complete independence from the state.

Islam (non-denominational)Edit

Main article: Non-denominational Muslim

States which define Islam as the state religion, but do not specify either Sunni or Shia.

  •  Bangladesh : The 1972 constitution did not include any religion as the state religion. However, in 1988, general Ershad inserted Islam as the state religion by the Eighth Amendment Act. 1988; section 2A specifies “The state religion of the Republic is Islam, but other religions may be practiced in peace and harmony in the Republic.”.[33] As part of a series of rulings, on 4 October 2010 the High Court ruled that Bangladesh is a secular state.[34] Section 12 of part II of the constitution identifies Secularism and freedom of religion as fundamental principles of state policy[35]
  •  Djibouti[36]
  •  Iraq : Article 2 of the Constitution of Iraq confirms Islam as the official religion of the State.
  •  Pakistan : article 2 of the Constitution of Pakistan confirms Islam as the state religion.[37]
  •  Palestine: the Palestinian Constitution defines Islam as the state religion, but ensures “‘respect and sanctity of all other heavenly religions shall be maintained'”.[38]
  •  Tunisia: Art. 1, Constitution of Tunisia

Sunni IslamEdit

Shiʾa IslamEdit

IbadiEdit

Mixed Shia and SunniEdit

Buddhist countriesEdit

Governments where Buddhism, either a specific form of, or the whole, has been established as an official religion:

Theravada BuddhismEdit

  •  Cambodia[39]
  •  Sri Lanka: the constitution of Sri Lanka accords Buddhism the “foremost place”, although it does not identify it as a state religion.[40]
  •  Thailand: the 2007 Thai constitution, recognises Buddhism as “the religion of Thai tradition with the most adherents”, however, it is not formally identified as a state religion. It requires the government to “patronize and protect Buddhism and other religions”.[41]
  •  Myanmar: Section 361 of the constitution states that “The Union recognizes special position of Buddhism as the faith professed by the great majority of the citizens of the Union.”.[42]

Vajrayana BuddhismEdit

Status of religion in IsraelEdit

See also: Jewish state

Israel is defined in several of its laws as a “Jewish and democratic state” (medina yehudit ve-demokratit). However, the term “Jewish” is a polyseme that can describe the Jewish people as both an ethnic or a religious group. The debate about the meaning of the term “Jewish” and its legal and social applications is one of the most profound issues with which Israeli society deals. The problem of the status of religion in Israel, even though it is relevant to all religions, usually refers to the status of Judaism in Israeli society. Thus, even though from a constitutional point of view Judaism is not the state religion in Israel, its status nevertheless determines relations between religion and state and the extent to which religion influences the political center.[44]

The State of Israel supports religious institutions, particularly Orthodox Jewish ones, and recognizes the “religious communities” as carried over from those recognized under the British Mandate. These are: Jewish and Christian (Eastern Orthodox, Latin [Catholic], Gregorian-Armenian, Armenian-Catholic, Syrian [Catholic], Chaldean [Uniate], Greek Catholic Melkite, Maronite, and Syrian Orthodox).

Everyone is free to believe in whatever they please, but it is considered a private matter. We don’t need monumental buildings to protect our faith. God didn’t ask us to judge people in his place. Who are we to judge and punish in his name? He knows what to do of us when our time comes.

In Secular countries such as France, they’ve associated the word secularism with Atheism, it is the biggest non-believing country in europe.

Among the founders of secularism such as James Madison, Thomas Jefferson or Jules Ferry, none of them has made any religious discrimination as they do now.

But it is also true that “Your beliefs are your private religion”.

Author: Novus Lectio

You'll never know what you'll read next. Random lecture is what is all about but one thing is for sure, it's by the same author who wrote The Theory of Fate and Who Went Out of Africa

6 thoughts on “What about … #8”

  1. Aah I sent the comment too early. I was a still typing.😂
    And I really like the post. The way countries and their religion was stated was awesome. Informational!
    I liked it soooooo much.😋😂😉

    Liked by 1 person

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